WILLIAM SCHNEIDER
PhD, Social Work, Columbia University (2016)
Cohort Two Fellow
schneider.william@gmail.com

Academic Mentor
Jane Waldfogel
Compton Foundation Professor, Columbia University

Policy Mentor
Sheila Smith
Director, Early Childhood; National Center for Children in Poverty

Current Institutional Affiliation
University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana, School of Social Work

Areas of Expertise

Early Childhood Education and Initiatives, Economic Supports for Families, Families and Family Systems, Difference in Difference Modeling, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Regression Modeling, Survival Analysis or Hazard Models, Fathers, Infants and Toddlers, LGBTQ Youth, Low-Income Families and Individuals, Preschool-aged Children

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Schneider is an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois- Urbana/Champaign. Prior to UIUC, Dr. Schneider was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) at Northwestern University. At IPR he worked under P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale on the Northwestern University Two-Generation Research Initiative. He received his PhD in social policy and policy analysis from the Columbia University School of Social Work in 2016. He was a Doris Duke Fellow for the Promotion of Child Well-being from 2012-2014.

Dr. Schneider received an MSW from Columbia University in 2013 and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan in 2007. He previously worked at the National Center for Children in Poverty at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and at the Center for Research on Child Well-being at Princeton University. 

His broad research interests are focused on family complexity, child maltreatment, fatherhood, parenting, and child development. Dr. Schneider's dissertation research studied the ways in which parental relationships and parenting influence the risk for child maltreatment by mothers and fathers. He also conducts research evaluating the effectiveness of community-based interventions in the lives of low-income families.